Both companies are offering zero fees for one month to help migrant workers. 

 

SINGAPORE, JUNE 16, 2019—In celebration of today, International Day of Family Remittances (IDFR), Thunes, a B2B global payments platform for emerging markets, and E9pay, an overseas remittance payment company based in South Korea, are offering zero fees for one month to Burmese diaspora in South Korea. IDFR recognizes the noteworthy financial contribution migrant workers make to the welfare of their families back home.

Thunes’ network supports remittances to emerging markets by enabling its partners to move funds in and out, all in real-time, making financial services accessible for everyone.  The B2B powerhouse offers three forms of payments: P2P remittance processing, mass payouts and digital payments.  E9pay provides services needed by foreign workers such as overseas remittance, transaction inquiry, and prepaid phone management. The company has changed the lives of more than 300,000 foreign workers.

“Celebrating the greater impact on the local economy of remittances is proof that our work and network help make financial services available and accessible,” says CEO of Thunes, Steve Vickers. “Migrant workers work tirelessly to send remittances home to family members and through our network, we help unlock opportunities for them with our partner E9pay. Thunes is honored to celebrate them today by giving a substantial gift.”

“E9pay’s main objective has always been to build a transfer service that enables easier, quicker and more secure remittances across the world for foreign workers who have faced various barriers in remitting their income to their home country,” says Representative Director of E9pay, Hyuk Goo Jeon. “Thanks to our partner Thunes, we have a chance to celebrate them and offer a zero fee special promotion to the Burmeses diaspora.”

According to the United Nations, more than 200 million international migrants send $500 billion dollars back home to their families in developing countries each year. Roughly 50 percent, $240 billion, reaches people in poor rural areas, three times more than most countries receive as Official Development Assistance (ODA). These remittances not only put food on the table and send children to school, they support local economies in the community’s back home and they contribute to the Sustainable Development Goals that global leaders agreed they would reach by 2030.